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MEDAILLES SUR LES PRINCIPAUX EVENEMENTS DU REGNE DE LOUIS LE GRAND
[Gros de Boze, Claude] (Editor).

MEDAILLES SUR LES PRINCIPAUX EVENEMENTS DU REGNE DE LOUIS LE GRAND

Avec des Explications Historiques. Par l’Académie Royale des Médailles & des Inscriptions. A Paris de L’Imprimerie Royale 1702.
4to. Ed. Engraved port. frontis., t.p., Advertisement leaf, 286 leaves printed one side only with an engraved medal to head. Some light browning, faint ink stamp to verso of t.p. offset to advert. leaf, marbled e.ps., hinges taped, French style early calf backed marbled boards, some darkening to edges, rebacked with original repaired gilt ruled spine laid down, modern gilt lettered labels. First published in a folio edition in the same year, with two medals to head of each leaf (the quarto edition has with the exception of leaf one and three has only one medal to each leaf. Also the quarto edition has no decorative border). The frontispiece is signed as drawn by A. Coypel and engraved by Simonneau l'aîné; the portrait of Louis XIV which it incorporates is attributed in the Preface to the Folio edition to Rigaud. Although none of the illustrations is signed, many are drawn by Coypel, the rest by Leclerc, and the fleurons by Berain; the engravings were by Mauger, Roettiers, Bernard et Roussel, Edelink, the Simonneau brothers, Audran and Picard ('Les connoisseurs distingueront bien le travail des uns & des autres'). ‘The folio edition which we have just completed of this work not being sufficient to satisfy the curiosity of the public, we wanted to satisfy it and give it as quickly as possible an edition in quarto. It is not of the magnificence of the first, but it does not fail to have its beauties. We did not see fit to repeat the tests for each setback, and we contented ourselves with putting them on the first medal of each of the different ages, which we distributed in eight. What is special about this edition is that all the medals are engraved with the same size with which they were newly minted. ‘This fine example of royal publicity and medal-design is chiefly celebrated for its typography. In 1692 the French Academy of Sciences set up a committee to establish standards for all crafts; as a result of which Jacques Jaugeon produced in 1695 a 'rational' design for letters, in which they all have a perfectly vertical axis and perfectly horizontal, symmetrical serifs, far removed from the more flowing forms of ancient or Renaissance lettering. Philippe Grandjean was commissioned to cut punches based on Jaugeon's designs, and modified them to form the 'roman du roi' first used here.’ (Folio Edition at the Royal Academy).
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